The Kickstarter for the Women Up to No Good anthologies is back!

If you head on over there, you will find some great backer rewards and a whole lot of behind the scenes, author spotlights!

Over on Twitter, Joanne and Co. have been posting short excerpts from the stories in the anthologies–these are two I particularly like:

And then there’s one from this chick I know pretty well:

(Spoiler: that one’s my story, “Mary In the Looking Glass”!)

There are stories in these books from L. Timmel Duchamp, Chikodili Emelumadu, Nisi Shawl, D.A. Xiaolin Spires, Catherynne M. Valente, Alyssa Wong, Sonya Taaffe, and Damien Angelica Walters, along with a whole lot of other amazing writers.

(Fangirly fun facts:  Damien Angelica Walters guest-edited the issue of Penumbra eMag my story, “Hauntings,” appeared in!  And Nisi Shawl and I were both in the April 2014 issues of Strange Horizons, so we spent a couple weeks in the same “table of contents”–read: front page.  My brushes with greatness, let me show you them.)

So if you find this intriguing, hop on over to the Kickstarter and check it out–and please back the project, if you can!

 

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Support the Women Up to No Good Kickstarter!

img_9130  My story, “Mary In the Looking Glass,” is part of the Women Up to No Good anthology Broad Knowledge, and there is a Kickstarter for it and another of the Women Up to No Good anthologies, Sharp and Sugar Tooth.

If you’d like to support “writing by women and authors of marginalized sex and gender identities, about female protagonists whose knowledge or appetites are critical to their stories,” please click the link and check out the various donation levels and rewards.  (The dedication one is pretty cool, I gotta say.)

I’m just saying, you know you want to read a story by me about Mary with the bloody eyes, right?

shameless self-promotion

Yeah, yeah, actual content tomorrow … but first!

“The Lost Languages of Exiles” will be appearing in Best Vegan Science Fiction and Fantasy of 2017, which is a collection of vegan-friendly stories (not necessarily stories about veganism).

And Metaphorosis posted the origins of “Exiles,” if you’re interested in seeing where it came from.

the obligatory awards post

Through the fiery blushing and imposter syndrome, I give you my list of stuff that was published in 2017 …

The Lost Languages of Exiles,” in Metaphorosis

Safe As Houses” in Gallery of Curiosities*

“Four Cassandras” in The Cassandra Project

And apparently Dropping Slow could be nominated as a novella, but that seems a bit weird.

*I’m not entirely sure what category this would fall under?  But I’m putting it in, anyway.


 

It feels slightly less uncomfortable to aim you at work from 2017 that I liked a lot and is not by me:

Jason Kimble has three stories eligible for awards, all of which I love for different reasons.

Clearly Lettered in a Mostly Steady Hand” by Fran Wilde, which is so weird and creepy and cooooool …

Seanan McGuire published and posted a lot of great stuff last year–“From A to Z In the Book of Changes,” via her Patreon, was a great story.

I admit, I’m not entirely through all the stories in The Best of Metaphorosis 2017, but “The Illuminator Leaves” by Molly Etta was lovely.

The Murders of Molly Southbourne  by Tade Thompson–this should win awards just for remembering that if blood is An Issue, a female protagonist will have That Issue to deal with once a month.

All Systems Red by Martha Wells–oh my god, I loved this and cannot wait for the next one.

Killing Gravity by Corey J. White–again, I loved this book and cannot wait for the next one.

A Queen from the North by Erin McRae and Racheline Maltese–this is AU British history romance with magic; I dug it.

Agents of Dreamland by Caitlin R. Kiernan–disquieting and haunting like all of Kiernan’s work.

 

 

 

 

So a little bit of self-promotion …

“The Lost Languages of Exiles” has been chosen for The Best of Metaphorosis 2017!

It will be coming out February 1st, and I’m thrilled to have “Exiles” included.


Two artists whose work survives into the universe of “Exiles” and Dropping Slow are Tom Jones and Ursula K. LeGuin.  There’s a reason Lia reads A Fisherman of the Inland Sea in “Exiles,” and of course the reason is the last story in the collection.

I wrote this on Facebook today:

She was a difficult, thinking, demanding writer whose books taught me a lot about earned endings and the intricacies of tracing people’s interior lives. She was not afraid to look at her old work and grapple with it to make it better. She was a foundation of my genres, better than just about anyone else in them—the world is better because her books are in it, and lessened by the loss of her.

I think everyone seems to be linking to “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas,” and that is an amazing story.  But I would send you to “Another Story OR A Fisherman of the Inland Sea,” The Tombs of Atuan, Four Ways to Forgiveness, and The Word for World is Forest.