the obligatory awards post

Through the fiery blushing and imposter syndrome, I give you my list of stuff that was published in 2017 …

The Lost Languages of Exiles,” in Metaphorosis

Safe As Houses” in Gallery of Curiosities*

“Four Cassandras” in The Cassandra Project

And apparently Dropping Slow could be nominated as a novella, but that seems a bit weird.

*I’m not entirely sure what category this would fall under?  But I’m putting it in, anyway.


 

It feels slightly less uncomfortable to aim you at work from 2017 that I liked a lot and is not by me:

Jason Kimble has three stories eligible for awards, all of which I love for different reasons.

Clearly Lettered in a Mostly Steady Hand” by Fran Wilde, which is so weird and creepy and cooooool …

Seanan McGuire published and posted a lot of great stuff last year–“From A to Z In the Book of Changes,” via her Patreon, was a great story.

I admit, I’m not entirely through all the stories in The Best of Metaphorosis 2017, but “The Illuminator Leaves” by Molly Etta was lovely.

The Murders of Molly Southbourne  by Tade Thompson–this should win awards just for remembering that if blood is An Issue, a female protagonist will have That Issue to deal with once a month.

All Systems Red by Martha Wells–oh my god, I loved this and cannot wait for the next one.

Killing Gravity by Corey J. White–again, I loved this book and cannot wait for the next one.

A Queen from the North by Erin McRae and Racheline Maltese–this is AU British history romance with magic; I dug it.

Agents of Dreamland by Caitlin R. Kiernan–disquieting and haunting like all of Kiernan’s work.

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

So a little bit of self-promotion …

“The Lost Languages of Exiles” has been chosen for The Best of Metaphorosis 2017!

It will be coming out February 1st, and I’m thrilled to have “Exiles” included.


Two artists whose work survives into the universe of “Exiles” and Dropping Slow are Tom Jones and Ursula K. LeGuin.  There’s a reason Lia reads A Fisherman of the Inland Sea in “Exiles,” and of course the reason is the last story in the collection.

I wrote this on Facebook today:

She was a difficult, thinking, demanding writer whose books taught me a lot about earned endings and the intricacies of tracing people’s interior lives. She was not afraid to look at her old work and grapple with it to make it better. She was a foundation of my genres, better than just about anyone else in them—the world is better because her books are in it, and lessened by the loss of her.

I think everyone seems to be linking to “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas,” and that is an amazing story.  But I would send you to “Another Story OR A Fisherman of the Inland Sea,” The Tombs of Atuan, Four Ways to Forgiveness, and The Word for World is Forest.

Story promotion: “Safe as Houses”

So a couple of things about “Safe as Houses,” which you can find over at Gallery of Curiosities in a variety of audio formats for your listening pleasure:

  1. I have a writing bucket list, and one of the things on it is to have a story on a podcast. And now I do!  Sarah Heiner reads it, and does an excellent job–she hits the tone I had in my head exactly.[1]  
  2. The first draft of this was exactly 300 words long, without my even trying (yes, Facebook friends, this is that story).  I, of course, immediately destroyed that via revision, but whatever–it happened, it was cool, the end.
  3. There are no Teachouts in this story, but you can find a reference to this house in “The Drowned Man,”[2] if you go looking hard enough. (The house is in San Xavier–not that you can tell–but this story takes place much closer to the present day than the girls’ stories do.) 
  4. “The Automat’s Automaton” by Angela Enos is the other story on the podcast, and it’s also really cool.

1 [back] No, I have totally not listened to the podcast like more than five or six times since it went up, what?

2 [back]I would, quite frankly, be delighted if someone found the reference to this one in “Drowned Man” and told me about it.  Just saying.  Like, I might write a Teachout drabble or a random poem for someone.

Two stories out today!

One of them I knew about, one of them a surprise.

“The Lost Languages of Exiles” is up at Metaphorosis!  It’s a love story set in the same universe as Dropping Slow.

“Safe as Houses” is up on the Gallery of Curiosities podcast!  It’s also a love story, of a sort.  No Teachouts to be found, but it is set in their world.

(I am currently battening down the hatches for Hurricane Irma, so I will post a bit more about both of these when I have a little more time–and, I hope, electricity.  We’re not in the direct path of the storm, but close enough to prepare.)

poem by me (Pismo Beach quote is Bugs Bunny’s; ‘Now the work at home begins’ is from “What’d I Miss” in Hamilton by Lin-Manuel Miranda)

The text (because it’s so tiny in the photo):

We stand below
(no matter where you keep
your TV
your computer
your radio
we’re always standing below for this)
and side by side.
(Hi there.  Hello.)
There are so many of us,
not cheering
or applauding;
linking arms and watching.

So here we are
(Pismo Beach and all the clams we can eat!)
Line (in the sand) crossed, marked by
the star-studded (oh, wait) event
in the cold, by that hand
(nope, not going to say it)
on that Bible.

Months of what if
(maybe it’ll be
who knows
makes no sense
no predicting
totally predicting
worry
fundraising
anger
grief
what the actual fuck?)
are over.
Now we’ll see.
Now it starts.
“Now the work at home begins.”


This is part of the Every Single Day Challenge, to raise money for the ACLU. You can donate any time; if you can’t donate, please feel free to signal boost.